The Mighty Quinn

Jim writes about this song today and gives various ideas on what it might be about. An ex told me it was about a drug dealer. That makes sense. I nicknamed a character in a book “the Eskimo” because of that, and yes he was a drug dealer. I didn’t write much about the drugs themselves, since I don’t know anything and research is boring; instead I wrote about two guys having a long funny convo in the drug dealer’s house about which women they’d rather bang, such as Ginger or Mary Ann, etc. My story got way off-track because I began to enjoy writing these conversations more than the lurve scenes between the actual main characters, and I struggled with giving the protagonists enough screen time, so to speak. For some reason, this book isn’t even up for sale in my glob of books. That must be because I couldn’t decide which version to self-publish. Let’s take a vote.

1. The long one with all the off-track scenes left in that don’t even have much to do with the lurve story at all and make the book way too long for a romance novel but are funny?

2. The semi-cleaned up one that is less funny but more focused on the actual lurve story?

3. The super cleaned up version?

Then vote:

A. Prologue, which Elmore Leonard hates, but adds texture.

B. No prologue.

Title:

i. Attractive Nuisance (relevant legal term).

ii. Sweet Nothings (name of her lingerie store).

Thanks for your help!

P.S. Please remember that I still can’t read minds and you actually have to tell me in the comments what you want! ๐Ÿ˜€

25 responses to “The Mighty Quinn

  1. Maybe you should collaborate with somebody that does know about drugs which I have some experience with and I also love doing research.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I think you shouldnโ€™t sacrifice funny for romance. Romance is fine, but funny, humorous, witty romance is better. As to prologue or no prologue, Iโ€™m ambivalent. And finally, I like โ€œSweet Nothings.โ€

    Liked by 1 person

  3. 1 for sure, but no big opinion on the other 2 questions.

    Dylan later changed his story, but originally it was thought that it was Anthony Quinn who played an Eskimo in a 1960 film that Bob liked, or at least he liked Quinn’s acting in the movie. But yeah, the words can be interpreted as a drug dealer…

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Long funny version, No Prologue (See asterisk below)*, and “Attractive Nuisance”.

    *No Prologue doesn’t mean no setup — at least minimal scene dressing in the first few lines so we’re not just dropped cold into a conversation between two strangers of uncertain relation, unless you’re going for a kind of disorientation. That works well when it works, but is REALLY hard to pull off.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. 2, a, i. Haven’t come across “attractive nuisance” so that intrigues me, while “sweet nothings” has been used a lot. However, I’m a bit torn here since “Sweet Nothings” features in the book. Not torn about my other answers: I like a good prologue and a bit of off-topic banter, especially if funny.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I know this doesn’t help, but you’ve got to decide for yourself, really. Funnily enough, I’ve just been writing, by hand, about a romance I once wrote – I haven’t posted it yet. And it went off-track. I suppose it depends on whether you want it to be a romance, in which case you cut all the extraneous stuff to what is expected in a romance, or you decide it isn’t a romance – it just has love interest – and leave everything in that you like.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah. At one time, I hoped to be traditionally published, which is why I wrote a second and third version. But now I donโ€™t see that happening. I might as well self-pub the version I like, though now I want to go through the second two and see if there are new, better things to put in the first one. Why not make it even longer?! ๐Ÿ˜‚

      Liked by 1 person

  7. “This wine is taking me higher than helium,” he thought, licking the stamp to put on the letter he wouldn’t send later on.

    Liked by 1 person

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