Captive Audience

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I began a new book last week: Crimes Against a Book Club by Kathy Cooperman. It had been hanging around my Kindle pile for a while. I guess it had appealed to me when I downloaded it and then not so much after that. But I finally opened it and jumped in. It didn’t grab me much at first… too many characters, too many POVS, a big mishmash. Yuck.

And it had a snotty, snarky narrative voice. Very cliched. Hi honey it’s me your best girlfriend and ooh we are gonna dish on everything and everyone and be bitches to the maxipad, oh yes we are babes, we are about to Joan Rivers this place UP!

Bleargh. I debated cutting my losses after a few chapters. After all, didn’t we just discuss how life is too short for annoying books and shitty movies? I believe we did.

But idk, there was something… different about CAABC that kept me going. I had no idea what would happen. None, zero, zip. I like that lately. And I don’t mean because it was surreal and crazy (ick); I mean because the characters were interesting and complex. Finally they sorted themselves out into two main protags with separate motivations. The satellite characters were less interesting, but had humorous moments. The narration became less Joan Riversy and straightforward with legit funny moments. Someone I wasn’t expecting suddenly played a major part toward the end and that became super hilarious and dare I say… a little bit profound!

I enjoyed the La Jolla/San Diego setting and the takedown of the ultra wealthy, though it was done relatively gently. There were some stellar mommy moments too ~ of various ages of mommyhood, which doesn’t end when kids are legal adults. Often a novel hooks me at the start and overpromises and underdelivers; CAABC did the opposite. It served up a tedious appetizer, a mediocre salad, but produced a tasty main dish, yummy sides, and finished off with a splendid dessert.

I highly recommend Crimes Against a Book Club.

~*~

The Daily Prompt: Captivating

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3 responses to “Captive Audience

  1. I’ll add it to my goodreads list!

    Like

  2. I love history and historical fiction so I had gobbled up all of Gabaldon’s books about outlandish things back when.

    I tend to listen to audio books a lot during my work commutes and workouts. I buy book credits each month from Audible. One book is (usually) one credit. I want to maximize my reading (listening) time so when I shop for Audible books, I sort first on length. If it’s a 6 hour book, fuggeddaboudit. I can get a Kindle or paper book on my own there. I prefer 25-30 hour books.

    So a novel called Sarum: A (something) of England ended up in my library and I started listening to it. I profess I did not read the comments regarding it. I probably should have. What I hoped for was something Michener-like only about England instead of a South Pacific island or Colorado or whatever. The tale is told in a Micheneresque pattern of tracking a few sets of genomic families through the ages however.

    The writer writes like a boring college professor lecturing bored students. He tries to tell some of the events in story format, but his characters are cardboard and many of the details are drawn from this guy’s prejudices rather than anthropological likelihood. And grammatical issues! Finally, the reader, a minor actress, makes me cringe as all of the male characters sound like whinging morons and all of the females are piping-voiced simpletons.

    I’m plodding through it because I want to get a good sense of the historical events that I believe are fairly accurate, even if the motivations are suspect. After all, many of my biological forebears are from England, albeit not likely from Salisbury.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I tried to read something by Sarah Vowell–ordinarily her historical stuff is very interesting, but this one was indeed snarky. I don’t mind snark but it seemed like she was trying too hard. It was very tiresome. I gave up on that book. Same with Kory Stamper’s blog about her adventures as a lexicographer at Merriam-Webster. The term snark seems too mild at times. Point is I wonder if I find this so irritating because I see myself. I hope not but I’ll give it some thought.

    Liked by 1 person

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