Empty [repost]

Dying rose in the dark

These empty, faceless days
Pass in a nameless haze;
A smorgasbord of news bites
Leaves our minds eaten away.
Should we be grateful or afraid?
Tomorrow promises the same;
Isolated from routines,
We adapt to this new distance–
Please stay six feet away.
Flower children, pressed inside
Our individual pages:
We remain solitary,
Confined, safe, waiting
To be allowed to play
Once again. To hold hands,
To hug and dance!
Will it ever be the same?
I wonder what
The history books will say
About us.

~*~

Poetry form: free verse.

Image from Pixabay.

©️2021 Paula Light and Light Motifs II. No unauthorized use permitted. Please check out Paula’s books for sale on Amazon.

Octopussy [April A2Z]

Roger Moore James Bond 007 Octopussy

Welcome to my April A-Z! This month I will be posting about James Bond 007 every day except Sunday, mostly focusing on the movies, not the books. Enjoy!

Roger Moore takes on the 007 role for the sixth time in Eon Production’s Octopussy (1983). The title is taken from an Ian Fleming short story, but the movie plot is original. Bond is investigating the death of fellow agent 009 in Germany, which leads him to a baddie who is stealing from the Soviets. The agent was holding a fake Faberge egg when he died, so Bond tracks down the seller at a London auction, where he gets into a bidding war with Kamal Khan, an exiled Afghan prince played by Louis Jourdan. Bond swaps the real egg for a fake one and follows Khan back to his palace in India. Next, Bond meets Khan’s gorgeous associate Octopussy, played by Maud Adams. Yada yada. The convoluted idea is that Khan and Octopussy are planning to help some big baddie expand Soviet control in Europe by stealing priceless Soviet treasures, such as Faberge eggs, and replacing them with fakes. One fake contains a nuke that is supposed to explode at a US Air Force base circus, which would allegedly trigger immediate disarmament of Europe (due to nukes being too dangerous, right?), and then the Soviets could take over. What a dumb plot. Honestly, this is not my favorite Bond flick.

But it begins with O, so there ya go!

Tune in Monday for more A-Z Bond!

~*~

Information and images from Wikipedia and 123Movie.

©️2021 Paula Light and Light Motifs II. No unauthorized use permitted. Please check out Paula’s books for sale on Amazon. Thank you.

Like a Reprieve [repost]

Colorful sunrise couple

Like a reprieve
Comes the soft morning breeze;
An unwrinkled sheet between us,
Bisecting yet connecting
Blazing dreams
And cold quotidian chores.
We’re given a chance once more
To drift weightlessly,
Aimlessly,
In apricot-tinged hope
On an undemanding tightrope.
The thin glimmer of
Love’s gold shimmer
Becomes a carousel of birdsong
In this rose-petaled dawn.
Almost here,
Almost there—
We toss our hearts in the air,
Suspended,
Unrepentant.
One last shuddering streak—
Violet periwinkle pink—
Soon dissipates
In the bright eye of day.

~*~

Poetry form: free verse.

Image source Pixabay.

©️2021 Paula Light and Light Motifs II. No unauthorized use permitted. Please check out Paula’s books for sale on Amazon. Thank you.

Nobody Does It Better [April A2Z]

James Bond 007 logo

Welcome to my April A-Z! This month I will be posting about James Bond 007 every day except Sunday, mostly focusing on the movies, not the books. Enjoy!

One of the most enjoyable aspects of a Bond flick is the music. Fans love to hear the signature theme play near the beginning after “Bond, James Bond” introduces himself and the scene segues to the “gun barrel sequence.” Almost every 007 film begins this way. That original music was written by Monty Norman, who has received royalties since 1962. John Barry wrote the “007 adventure” music for From Russia with Love, and this music has appeared during action scenes of subsequent Bond films. Norman has won two libel actions against publishers for claiming that Barry wrote the theme. The James Bond Theme is what plays during the gun barrel sequence (and sometimes other places). Monty and John are listed as composers on some of the songs that play during the films (the songs are distinct from the theme music).

Luckily for us, YouTube has a plethora of videos to choose from to watch the opening sequence of Bond films along with the music. I chose a compilation to share and it’s really interesting to view the subtle changes in the gun barrel sequence as well as slight modifications to the tune. What’s also interesting is to see how much more comfortable Connery and Craig are when firing their guns as opposed to Moore, who actually hated guns in real life. I never noticed that before, but it’s obvious when you view the openings one after another. Yes, I watched the whole thing as a true Bond aficionado.

Bond films have introduced us to memorable songs as well. I already mentioned Shirley Bassey singing “Goldfinger” and “Diamonds Are Forever,” and there are many more. Other great tunes are “Thunderball” sung by Tom Jones, “Live and Let Die” written and performed by Paul McCartney & Wings, “Nobody Does It Better” sung by Carly Simon (for The Spy Who Loved Me), and “Writing’s On the Wall” written and performed by Sam Smith (for Spectre). I had mixed feelings about Adele’s “Skyfall,” but it’s grown on me. I love her singing generally, but I thought that song was too “light” for such a heavy movie at the time.

My personal favorite is the Carly song.

Tune in tomorrow for more A-Z Bond!

~*~

Information and images from Wikipedia, Wallpapercave.

©️2021 Paula Light and Light Motifs II. No unauthorized use permitted. Please check out Paula’s books for sale on Amazon. Thank you.

Spring Reflections

City buildings lights reflect water

Spring is a time of love and sorrow for me…


March brings me reminders of my father’s death day and also the anniversary of my marriage to the ex. Happy and sad memories are triggered in both cases. There’s also the joy of my youngest daughter’s birthday.

April blossoms with the dates of Dad’s birthday, Mom’s death day, and another ex’s birthday. My own birthday falls at the end of the month, and, again, reflecting on that event conjures up a mix of feelings. A few weeks later in May is Mother’s Day, summoning joy and grief all at once.

June is another emotional tangle, containing my sweet little granddaughter’s birthday, Mom’s, the ex-hubby’s, Father’s Day, etc. That’s a lot of mental snapshots to sort through and process. There are times it’s a pleasure; other times it’s a trial.

Mom was a huge fan of Johnny Cash and passed that love onto me. He had such enormous talent that he transcended the country music genre. For a while, I kept my fondness for country on the down low, since so many fellow rock fans proclaimed a flagrant loathing of it. But I don’t care anymore and will shout that I like the sound of country comfort!

Today, Jim Adams posts about one of my favorite JC songs “Man in Black.” It feels appropriate to listen to right now because of my own memories and also because of all the sadness and injustice throughout the world. I share with you a cover of “500 Miles” (aka “The Railroader’s Lament”) by Johnny’s eldest daughter Rosanne Cash, who is successful in her own right, has had many No. 1 hits, and writes books too.

The writing credits to this song are a bit murky, but it is generally credited to Hedy West. There have been many versions, including Johnny’s. The 1963 cover by Bobby Bare was the most commercially successful.

Written for Eugi’s Weekly Prompt and Jim Adams’ Thursday Inspiration.

Image from Lovethispic.

©️2021 Paula Light and Light Motifs II. No unauthorized use permitted. Please check out Paula’s books for sale on Amazon. Thank you.

The Final Offering [repost]

Offering

“What have you brought me tonight?” asked the demon of the maiden.

“I bring you all the stars in the sky, and I humbly beg you to spare my beloved,” said the maiden to the demon with tears flowing down her translucent misty gown.

“It is not enough,” growled the demon.

The maiden departed and returned in a thousand years with another gift to present in trade.

“What have you bought me tonight?” asked the demon of the maiden.

“I bring you all the music from the spheres, and I humbly beg you to spare my beloved,” said the maiden to the demon with tears flowing down her translucent misty gown.

“It is not enough,” growled the demon.

The maiden departed and returned in ten thousand years with another gift to present in trade.

“What have you bought me tonight?” asked the demon of the maiden.

“I bring you myself, my final offering, all I have left, and I humbly beg you to spare my beloved,” said the maiden to the demon with tears flowing down her translucent misty gown.

“I accept,” said the demon, “for I am your beloved. Welcome home.”

~*~

Image credit to Sue Vincent (RIP).

Written for the Daily Echo.

©️2021 Paula Light and Light Motifs II. No unauthorized use permitted. Please check out Paula’s books for sale on Amazon.

Moneypenny [April A2Z]

007 and moneypenny

Welcome to my April A-Z! This month I will be posting about James Bond 007 every day except Sunday, mostly focusing on the movies, not the books. Enjoy!

Miss Moneypenny is a beloved recurring character in the Bond franchise. Lois Maxwell portrayed her first, from 1962 to 1985 ~ she appeared in 14 Eon-produced Bond films and on a TV special. She is the secretary to James’ boss M, who is the head of MI6, British Secret Intelligence. Though she has only a few lines per film, the amusing banter and sexual tension between Moneypenny and Bond make for delightful dialog. In Ian Fleming’s novels, we don’t see this, but the films play it up a bit. She is not considered a “Bond girl” because she never has any kind of physical relationship with Bond, nor does she prance around in sexy outfits. Moneypenny is a professional, holding the rank of Second Officer in the Women’s Royal Naval Service, and has Top Secret, Eyes Only clearance. We get the idea that she would like to have a romantic relationship with Bond, but so far that has not occurred, except in a fantasy sequence (2002’s Die Another Day has Miss Moneypenny trying out Q’s virtual reality simulator).

In Skyfall (2012), Moneypenny is given a backstory for the first time. We also, finally, get treated to her first name: Eve. Miss Moneypenny was sadly missing from the first two Craig-Bond films, but in Skyfall she is given an enlarged role. For the first time also, she is played by a non-white actress, Naomie Harris.

Eve Moneypenny James Bond Skyfall

In this film, Eve is an MI6 field agent. She tries to help Bond as he fights with a baddie on top of a train in Turkey, but she doesn’t have a clear shot at the baddie. M orders her to shoot, and she ends up shooting Bond. He appears to die (but of course he does not). After that, she is removed from the field and given a desk job. At the end, she decides to stay behind the scenes and work for the new M, and she formally introduces herself to Bond as “Eve Moneypenny.” Naomie plays Moneypenny again in Spectre (2015) and we will see her reprise the role later this year in No Time To Die.

Tune in tomorrow for more A-Z Bond!

~*~

Information and images from Wikipedia, 007James, and James Bond Wiki.

©️2021 Paula Light and Light Motifs II. No unauthorized use permitted. Please check out Paula’s books for sale on Amazon. Thank you.

Swimming Alone on an Empty Stomach [repost]

dark green ocean underwater

I’ve been swimming alone
For a long time…
The water
First too cold,
Now sublime;
I slide,
I glide
Through the darkness,
Blind.
My wounds smoothed over
Are all on the inside.
When I bump up against you,
All buttery sleekness,
There’s nothing to hold onto,
No pain,
No weakness.
Two circling seekers
Float on unmolested,
Swallowed by the vastness,
No point of connection.
Bubbles of potential
Drift along indifferent,
While stars shine beyond
This sea of solipsis.

~*~

Image from Pixabay.

Poetry form: free verse.

©️2021 Paula Light and Light Motifs II. No unauthorized use permitted. Please check out Paula’s books for sale on Amazon. Thank you.

Live and Let Die [April A2Z]

live and let die James Bond

Welcome to my April A-Z! This month I will be posting about James Bond 007 every day except Sunday, mostly focusing on the movies, not the books. Enjoy!

It must be noted that Live and Let Die was released during the height of “blaxploitation” and contains some cringey references and stereotypes.

Regardless, it may be my favorite Bond movie. This 1973 film (Eon Productions) is the first time Roger Moore stars as Bond, and, while I realize there are differing opinions, I think he does a fantastic job! The story is about the drug trade, with Mr. Big planning to distribute tons of heroin for free to put his rival drug lords out of business, thus giving himself a monopoly. While investigating the deaths of fellow British agents in New York and New Orleans, Bond discovers that Mr. Big is from the fictional island of San Monique. Naturally, Bond must visit the island, which is teeming with poppies (where heroin comes from). Complications ensue! It’s a super fun film with loads of gangsters and voodoo and of course a beautiful girl whom Bond must save. Yaphet Kotto, who recently passed away, stars as Mr. Big and his alter ego Dr. Kanaga, a corrupt Caribbean dictator who rules San Monique. For a Bond film, the plot is quite straightforward!

Jane Seymour plays Solitaire, the main love interest in this movie. She is a virgin priestess who tells the future via tarot cards and Mr. Big needs her help as he continues with his scheme. Bond seduces Solitaire with a fake deck of cards and she loses her magical abilities, consequently putting her on the bad side of Mr. Big. She now must join forces with 007, or else.

live and let die 007 and solitaire

I haven’t mentioned Felix Leiter much ~ he’s Bond’s counterpart in the CIA and has a recurring role in many of the 007 films. In this one, he’s played by David Hedison, who also portrays Leiter in License to Kill (1989). He has funny lines in LALD, in particular a dialog with a southern sheriff, J.W. Pepper (played by Clifton James), as the sheriff tries to figure out what’s going on. As Bond escapes from the baddies on a wild speedboat ride, Pepper is outrageously hysterical. “Humorous” may not be the adjective first to mind when thinking of Bond films, but I find myself laughing throughout these movies.

Watch the following video for my favorite scene from LALD!

The title song, “Live and Let Die,” was written by Paul and Linda McCartney and performed by their band Wings. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song.

Tune in tomorrow for more A-Z Bond!

~*~

Information and images from Wikipedia, Cultbox, PopSugar, and IMDB.

©️2021 Paula Light and Light Motifs II. No unauthorized use permitted. Please check out Paula’s books for sale on Amazon. Thank you.

The Sum of All Kisses [repost]

romance novels

[Written in 2014.]


The only reason I slogged through this more boring than a boring boring book by Julia Quinn is because I’m on vacation and have plenty of free time to read. Also, it started out slightly promising by giving us a hero with exceptional math ability, which, as we all know, is hot.

Now, I’m the first one to admit that my own writing is somewhat lacking in the plot department, but that doesn’t mean I want to read someone else’s novel that has no plot whatsoever. TSOAK had nothing. It was a repulsive romp through a couple weeks in the lives of ridiculously rich, titled people back in 1820’s England ~ people that no one could possibly care about, ever.

The premise is that the brilliant hero Hugh gets drunk off his ass and forgets the cards he previously memorized, loses a game, and accuses his friend of cheating. Hugh is such an arrogant jerk about his “perfect” memory he can’t for a minute even consider the possibility that he messed up. There’s a duel, the guys shoot each other accidentally, and the story begins three years later with their vapid relatives and friends dealing with the etiquette involved in facing the two dudes at various parties and weddings. That’s the plot, plus a stupid twist at the end to create another hyper-charged, meaningless situation to pull the lovers apart for a couple hours.

The heroine Sarah is a silly, selfish girl. She “hates” Hugh even before she meets him because she blames him for the fact that three years ago she couldn’t have her debutante season and snag a husband. Apparently, since her cousin was the other duelist, her family had to stay on the down low for a while. Now she’s an old maid of 21, waaah! Also, major drama ~ Sarah hates playing the piano in the family music ensemble thingie, so will she be able to finagle her way out of the next command performance or not?! Wow, stay tuned. (Geddit?)

Sarah’s a spoiled, complaining princess, while Hugh is a grumpy, self-hating oaf. And the other characters are all fluff-brained people with meaningless lives who flit about from one ritzy estate to another. OMG WHICH CARRIAGE AM I RIDING IN?!? Also, there’s a constant theme of who can make the wittiest, snarkiest comment, and even that gets old quickly because there is nothing of substance happening, ever.

There was no actual interesting math either ~ Hugh keeps quickly multiplying big numbers in his head for people’s amusement. Blah. I’m never reading another Julia Quinn book. While you can’t really expect a romance novel to be deep and meaningful, they are supposed to be diverting and FUN.

Oh, there was serious cake, but even that didn’t save this book. Tragic.

~*~

Book cover image is mine. Kiss image source unknown.

©️2021 Paula Light and Light Motifs II. No unauthorized use permitted. Please check out Paula’s books for sale on Amazon. Thank you.